Statement

UN Secretary-General's remarks on International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women

25 November 2018

I am very pleased to be with you to discuss this essential topic.
 
Violence against women and girls is a global pandemic.
 
It is a moral affront to all women and girls and to us all, a mark of shame on all our societies, and a major obstacle to inclusive, equitable and sustainable development.
 
At its core, violence against women and girls in all its forms is the manifestation of a profound lack of respect – a failure by men to recognize the inherent equality and dignity of women.
 
It is an issue of fundamental human rights.
 
The violence can take many forms – from domestic violence to trafficking, from sexual violence in conflict to child marriage, genital mutilation and femicide.
 
It is an issue that harms the individual but also has far-reaching consequences for families and for society.
 
Violence experienced as a child is linked to vulnerability and violence later in life.
 
Other consequences include long-term physical and mental health impacts and costs to individuals and society in services and lost employment days. 
 
This is also a deeply political issue.
 
Violence against women is tied to broader issues of power and control in our societies.
 
We live in a male-dominated world.
 
Women are made vulnerable to violence through the multiple ways in which we keep them unequal.
 
When family laws which govern inheritance, custody and divorce discriminate against women, or when societies narrow women’s access to financial resources and credit, they impede a woman’s ability to leave abusive situations.
 
When institutions fail to believe victims, allow impunity, or neglect to put in place policies of protection, they send a strong signal that condones and enables violence.  
 
In the past year we have seen growing attention to one manifestation of this violence.
Sexual harassment is experienced by almost all women at some point in their lives.
 
No space is immune.  
 
It is rampant across institutions, private and public, including our very own.
 
This is by no means a new issue, but the increasing public disclosure by women from all regions and all walks of life is bringing the magnitude of the problem to light.
 
This effort to uncover society’s shame is also showing the galvanizing power of women’s movements to drive the action and awareness needed to eliminate harassment and violence everywhere.
 
This year, the global United Nations UNiTE campaign to end violence against women and girls is highlighting our support for survivors and advocates under the theme ‘Orange the World: #HearMeToo’.
 
With orange as the unifying colour of solidarity, the #HearMeToo hashtag is designed to send a clear message: violence against women and girls must end now, and we all have a role to play.
 
We need to do more to support victims and hold perpetrators accountable.
 
But, beyond that, it is imperative that we – as societies -- undertake the challenging work of transforming the structures and cultures that allow sexual harassment and other forms of gender-based violence to happen in the first place.
 
These include addressing the gender imbalances within our own institutions.
 
This is why we have adopted a UN system-wide gender parity strategy.
 
We have achieved parity in the senior management group and we are well on track to reach gender parity in senior leadership by 2021, and across the board by 2028.
 
The UN has also reaffirmed its zero-tolerance policy for sexual harassment and assault committed by staff and UN partners.
 
We have recruited specialized investigators on sexual harassment, instituted fast-track procedures for addressing complaints and initiated a 24/7 helpline for victims.
 
I also remain committed to ending all forms of sexual exploitation and abuse by peacekeepers and UN staff in the field – one of the first initiatives I took when I assumed office.
 
Nearly 100 Member States that support UN operations on the ground have now signed voluntary compacts with us to tackle the issue, and I call on others to join them, fully assuming their responsibilities, in training, but also in ending impunity.
 
Further afield, we are continuing to invest in life-changing initiatives for millions of women and girls worldwide through the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women.
 
This Fund focuses on preventing violence, implementing laws and policies and improving access to vital services for survivors.
 
With more than 460 programmes in 139 countries and territories over the past two decades, the UN Trust Fund is making a difference.
 
In particular, it is investing in women’s civil society organizations, one of the most important and effective investments we can make.
 
The UN is also working to deliver on a comprehensive, multi-stakeholder, innovative initiative to end all forms of violence against women and girls by 2030, in line with the Sustainable Development Goals.
 
The 500-million-euro EU-UN Spotlight Initiative is an important step forward in this direction.
 
As the largest-ever single investment in eradicating violence against women and girls worldwide, this initial contribution will address the rights and needs of women and girls across 25 countries and five regions.
 
It will empower survivors and advocates to share their stories and become agents of change in their homes, communities and countries.
 
A significant portion of the Spotlight’s initial investment will also go to civil society actors, including those that are reaching people often neglected by traditional aid efforts.
 
But even though this initial investment is significant, it is small given the scale of the need.
 
It should be seen as seed funding for a global movement in which we must play a role.
 
It is that global movement that we celebrate today, as we look forward to the coming 16 days devoted to ending gender-based violence.
 
Not until the half of our population represented by women and girls can live free of fear, violence and everyday insecurity, can we truly say we live in a fair and equal world.
 
Thank you very much.